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An Intro to Reverse 1031 Exchanges 

April 2, 2018

Section 1031 like-kind exchanges have come up on our blog multiple times in the recent past. This isn’t surprising. Section 1031 can be an extremely powerful wealth maximization tool. It figured prominently as a matter of debate in the most recent series of tax code revisions. Fortunately for taxpayers, the real estate provision of Section 1031 survived the revisions. As a result, real estate investors can still take advantage of Section 1031’s tax deferral benefits.

A Matter of Complexity

Just like reorganizations under Section 368, like-kind exchanges under Section 1031 have several variations; one variation is the “reverse” like-kind exchange. Reverse 1031 exchanges are a bit more complex than traditional “forward” 1031 exchanges. The latter involve acquiring the replacement property after the relinquished property has already been sold. With reverse exchanges, acquisition of the replacement property happens first. Only then is there is a sale of the relinquished property. 

In this article, we will cover in detail the mechanics of the reverse 1031 exchange process. We will then we will highlight some of the advantages conferred on investors by this type of transaction. These transactions are typically much more expensive than traditional forward exchanges. Nonetheless, they may be preferable in certain cases depending on facts and circumstances. 

Reverse 1031 Exchange Mechanics 

With the implementation of the Treasury Regulations under subsection (k), the structure of forward exchanges was firmly established. However, uncertainty lingered as to the precise structural requirements governing so-called “reverse” exchanges. In Revenue Procedure 2000-37, the IRS provided a “safe harbor” for reverse transactions by laying out a number of structural guidelines. 

Qualified Intermediaries

Under Rev. Proc. 2000-37, for example, taxpayers have 180 days to sell their relinquished property after their target replacement property is acquired. However, taxpayers cannot direct acquire the replacement property. That would involve holding title to both properties simultaneously. To structure the reverse exchange, the taxpayer should engage a qualified intermediary, a “QI” (or third party facilitator). The purpose of the QI is to “park” title to the replacement property. This happens through the use of a single member LLC. In this scenario, the single member LLC is an “exchange accommodation titleholder” or EAT. The QI or third party facilitator establishes an EAT, which parks title to the desired replacement property, The taxpayer then has 180 days to sell their property. Importantly, the taxpayer must sign a Qualified Exchange Accommodation Agreement, a “QEAA” with the EAT in order to create a valid parking arrangement.  

Beware of Gray Zones

It’s worth noting that Rev. Proc. 2000-37 only guarantees that there will be no challenge to the acceptability of the exchange, so long as the taxpayer stays within the procedure’s structural boundaries. Taxpayers can structure reverse exchanges outside of these boundaries, but doing so will put them in a “gray zone” and leave them vulnerable to possible challenges by the IRS. Fortunately, however, there is case law supporting reverse exchanges that are outside of the guidelines of 2000-37. No matter what the situation, you should always consult with a 1031 professional before attempting to structure a reverse 1031 exchange because a failed exchange can result in heavy penalties and interest. 

Reverse 1031 Advantages 

Given the complexity of reverse 1031 exchanges, you may be wondering why any taxpayer would wish to conduct such a transaction. Reverse 1031 exchanges are generally much more expensive than traditional exchanges, sometimes more than 10 times the cost. Accordingly, some question whether such transactions are worth the additional cost and effort.

Timing

One of the most important advantages of reverse exchanges is timing. The motivation behind most reverse exchanges has to do with the availability of the replacement property. Typically, the taxpayer focuses on acquiring a specific piece of real estate. Just as typically, the seller either doesn’t have a contract to sell his or her own property at that time. Or, the taxpayer’s contract to sell is set to be executed at a time when the replacement property will be off the market. In either scenario, it’s clear that the taxpayer would need to structure a reverse exchange in order to acquire the replacement property he or she desires. 

An Example

Let’s use a quick example to illustrate this point. Suppose a taxpayer wishes to utilize Section 1031 and procures a contract to sell his or her property. Let’s further suppose that the contract is concluded in the middle of March and has an execution date of May 15th. At the outset, the taxpayer doesn’t have any reason to back out of this contractual agreement because he or she hasn’t found any suitable replacement properties. However, let’s also suppose that, in the middle of April, the taxpayer finds the perfect replacement property, but that property is a hot commodity and will need to be acquired immediately otherwise it will certainly be unavailable by May 15th. This is the classic scenario in which a taxpayer can use a reverse like-kind exchange to acquire the replacement property. 

The Benefits

One of the other main benefits of reverse 1031 exchanges is the (effective) removal of the “identification requirement.” Under the regulations, taxpayers must properly “identify” replacement property before they acquire it. There is an exception to this general rule. That is, when the replacement property is received within 45 days, the property is considered to be identified automatically. Nonetheless, taxpayers should identify their replacement property in nearly all cases. In a reverse 1031 exchange, acquisition of the replacement property happens first, so this step is completed from the outset .

Call Us for Assistance!

This is just an introduction. There’s plenty more to reverse 1031 like-kind exchanges, and in the future we will dive back in and explore more of the complex issues associated with these transactions. If you need counsel with a reverse 1031 exchange, traditional forward exchange, or any other tax issue, you should reach out to Mackay, Caswell & Callahan, P.C. and chat with a top NYC tax attorney. Our attorneys understand Section 1031 exchanges and many other complex tax areas. We are happy to use our expertise to help you with your transaction! 

Image credit: woodleywonderworks 

Comments

The Popularity of Delaware Statutory Trusts – New York City Tax Attorney 1 year ago

[…] interest in real property for the purposes of Section 1031 (which we’ve covered extensively in prior articles).   This is expected, because tenancy-in-common interests (or TIC interests) are […]

Sec. 1031 Improvement Exchanges  – New York City Tax Attorney 1 year ago

[…] past, we’ve discussed the mechanics of standard, “forward” Section 1031 exchanges as well as reverse exchanges. There is another variation on Section 1031 exchanges which has the potential to be extremely […]

Leasehold Improvement Exchanges & Taxation | New York Tax Attorney 9 months ago

[…] blog in the past. We’ve discussed state tax issues, the use of vacation homes, New York co-ops, reverse 1031 exchanges, all above and beyond the basic principles of 1031 transactions. As we’ve seen, Section 1031 can […]

Sec. 1031 Combination Exchanges | New York Tax Attorney 8 months ago

[…] We’ve also covered the other, less common variations, such as the improvement exchange and reverse exchange. As it turns out, there is another variation which we have yet to explore. The so-called […]

What are the 1031 Safe Harbors? – Mackay, Caswell & Callahan, P.C. 3 months ago

[…] associated with the safe harbor provided by the IRS Revenue Procedure 2000-37, which applies to reverse exchanges. Let’s go over each of the safe harbors found under subsection […]

Leave a comment

Comments

The Popularity of Delaware Statutory Trusts – New York City Tax Attorney 1 year ago

[…] interest in real property for the purposes of Section 1031 (which we’ve covered extensively in prior articles).   This is expected, because tenancy-in-common interests (or TIC interests) are […]

Sec. 1031 Improvement Exchanges  – New York City Tax Attorney 1 year ago

[…] past, we’ve discussed the mechanics of standard, “forward” Section 1031 exchanges as well as reverse exchanges. There is another variation on Section 1031 exchanges which has the potential to be extremely […]

Leasehold Improvement Exchanges & Taxation | New York Tax Attorney 9 months ago

[…] blog in the past. We’ve discussed state tax issues, the use of vacation homes, New York co-ops, reverse 1031 exchanges, all above and beyond the basic principles of 1031 transactions. As we’ve seen, Section 1031 can […]

Sec. 1031 Combination Exchanges | New York Tax Attorney 8 months ago

[…] We’ve also covered the other, less common variations, such as the improvement exchange and reverse exchange. As it turns out, there is another variation which we have yet to explore. The so-called […]

What are the 1031 Safe Harbors? – Mackay, Caswell & Callahan, P.C. 3 months ago

[…] associated with the safe harbor provided by the IRS Revenue Procedure 2000-37, which applies to reverse exchanges. Let’s go over each of the safe harbors found under subsection […]

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